Poet and former Youth Laureate Amanda Gorman has book deal

NEW YORK — Former Youth Poet Laureate Amanda Gorman is working on a picture book.

Viking Children’s Books announced Thursday that Gorman’s “Change Sings: A Children’s Anthem” is scheduled for 2021. It’s the first part of a two-book deal.

The rising senior at Harvard University says in a statement that she wanted to share a “vision of positive change with young readers.” She was named the country’s first Youth Poet Laureate in 2017. The position is sponsored in part by the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities.

She has published a poetry collection, “The One for Whom Food Is Not Enough,” and read at the White House during the Obama administration. She recently performed an Independence Day poem for “CBS This Morning” with the Boston Pops Orchestra.

ABC’s ‘How to Get Away with Murder’ to end after next season

LOS ANGELES — It will be case closed next season for “How to Get Away with Murder,” with the show’s upcoming sixth season to be its last.

The series and its star, Viola Davis, are leaving behind history: In 2015, Davis became the first African American to win an Emmy for best lead actress in a drama series.

In a statement Thursday announcing the show’s end, ABC Entertainment President Karey Burke praised Davis for her unforgettable portrayal of a female antihero.

Davis plays Annalise Keating, a brilliant attorney and professor at a Philadelphia law school, where she teaches her no-holds-barred views of justice and life and enlists her students in her cases and misadventures.

A three-time Academy Award nominee, Davis won the best supporting actress Oscar in 2017 for “Fences.”

Series creator and executive producer Pete Nowalk called ending the show a “brutal decision,” but said the story demanded it.

“For me, Annalise Keating’s journey has always had a clear ending,” Nowalk said in a statement. “Knowing I have 15 episodes left to finish her story, and the chance to give all the characters their own killer endings” is a rare gift.

Taxpayers helped fund ‘Tonight Show’ broadcast in Minnesota

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Minnesota taxpayers helped foot the bill when Jimmy Fallon broadcast “The Tonight Show” from Minneapolis as part of last year’s Super Bowl festivities.

Minnesota Public Radio News obtained information via public records request that shows the state paid the show $267,000 through a rebate program.

The state’s Snowbate program is aimed at luring productions and fostering local industry talent. Talk shows are ineligible to participate in the program. But the show, which airs on NBC, was reclassified as a “variety show” to fit the confines of state law.

The records show that Michael Tabor, who’s a member of the program’s advisory committee, said giving away state funds to Fallon’s show “isn’t responsible.” He said NBC was set to be in Minnesota anyway because it was shooting the Super Bowl.

Compiled from TH wire services

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