Central America Migrant Caravan

A sleeping Honduran girl is carried as a group of Central American migrants, representing the thousands participating in a caravan trying to reach the U.S. border, undertake an hours-long march to the office of the United Nations' humans rights body in Mexico City, Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018. Members of the caravan which has stopped in Mexico City demanded buses Thursday to take them to the U.S. border, saying it tis too cold and dangerous to continue walking and hitchhiking.

WASHINGTON  — The Latest on President Donald Trump and immigration (all times local):

9:20 a.m.

President Donald Trump has signed a proclamation to deny asylum to migrants who enter the United States illegally through the U.S.-Mexico border.

Trump invoked the same national security powers he used to push his travel ban through. He says he wants people to come to the U.S. legally.

The move on Friday was spurred in part by caravans of Central American migrants slowly moving north on foot, but officials say it will apply to anyone caught crossing illegally.

Officials say the measure is meant to funnel asylum seekers through official border crossings for speedy rulings instead of having them try to circumvent such crossings on the nearly 2,000-mile (3,200-kilometer) stretch.

The busy ports of entry already have long lines and waits, forcing immigration officials to tell some migrants to return to make their claims.

Trump's proclamation puts into practice regulations adopted by immigration officials on Thursday.

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12:50 a.m.

The Trump administration says it will deny asylum to migrants who enter the country illegally. The administration is invoking extraordinary presidential national security powers to tighten the border as caravans of Central Americans slowly approach the United States.

The measures are meant to funnel asylum seekers through official border crossings for speedy rulings, officials said, instead of having them try to circumvent such crossings on the nearly 2,000-mile (3,200-kilometer) border. But the busy ports of entry already have long lines and waits, forcing immigration officials to tell some migrants to come back to make their claims.

The move was spurred in part by caravans of Central American migrants slowly moving north on foot, but officials say it will apply to anyone caught crossing illegally.

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