LOCAL CANCELLATIONS & DELAYS
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Published Sept. 6, 1959: Park Dept. tree foreman Karl Fink cuts a dead branch from a tree that has the symptoms of Dutch elm disease, but to date all tests made on Dubuque‚Äôs samples have been negative. Fink is standing on the platform of the department‚Äôs ‚Äúindustrial monkey‚Äù which is …

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Published May 4, 1966: A.H. Epstein, of Iowa State University, demonstrates Tuesday to Dubuquers in Washington Park his new method of stopping the growth of Dutch elm disease transmitted between trees when their roots grow together.

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Published April 29, 1964: A workman fastens a vial of anti-Dutch elm disease serum to a tree in Washington Park. The large tree is one of about 100 on city property to be treated in Dubuque this week on an experimental basis. The containers hold serum that is deadly to elm bark beetles, carr…

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Published Sept. 10, 1961: This four-block row of elm trees, forming a perfect arch above Rhomberg Avenue, was planted in 1885 by Dubuque businessman Joseph Andrew Rhomberg. The elm saplings were taken from the bluffs and islands of the Mississippi, and grew easily when transplanted.

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Published July 7, 1965: "The Lady Tree," a stately elm in Dubuque's Washington Park, was cut down Tuesday after it was found to have Dutch elm disease. A crowd was on hand to watch a Park Department crew bring it down. The tree, more than 12 feet in circumference at its base, was known as "T…