In the film “Knocked Up,” Katherine Heigl plays Alison, an entertainment reporter who finds herself pregnant after a one-night stand. She tries to hide her pregnancy, but it becomes difficult when during an interview she’s overwhelmed by nausea and has to run off the set in search of a receptacle. Alison doesn’t just have morning sickness. She has all-day sickness.

Researchers say Alison isn’t the only one who finds that the hormone-driven condition lasts all day. A study published in the British Journal of General Practice looked at the prevalence of misnamed “morning” sickness in the first seven weeks of pregnancy and found 94.2% of study participants experienced vomiting or nausea during the study, with 58% experiencing both. Vomiting was most common between 7 a.m. and 1 p.m., but nausea occurred throughout the entire day, and peaked in the evening. These symptoms were most common during weeks five through seven.

If you’re KO’d with pregnancy-related tummy troubles, try these remedies:

• Opt for easy-on-the-stomach foods, like the BRAT diet (Bananas, Rice, Applesauce, Toast).

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• Stay hydrated with six to eight glasses of water daily. Carbonated water may soothe.

• Be aware of foods and scents that trigger nausea, and avoid them.

• If home remedies don’t work, ask your doc about trying acupuncture or acupressure (reported to work for more than 60% of women) or a medication called Diclegis that’s a help for 40% to 70% of women.

If your sickness is severe and persistent, see your doc immediately to avoid complications.

Oz is host of “The Dr. Oz Show,” and Roizen is chief wellness officer and chair of Wellness Institute at Cleveland Clinic. To live your healthiest, tune into “The Dr. Oz Show” or visit www.sharecare.com.