U.S. tightens definition of service animals allowed on planes

A service dog named Orlando rests on the foot of its trainer, John Reddan, while sitting inside a United Airlines plane at Newark Liberty International Airport. The government has decided that when it comes to air travel, only dogs can be service animals, and companions used for emotional support don't count.

The government has decided that when it comes to air travel, only dogs can be service animals, and companions used for emotional support don't count.

The Transportation Department issued a final rule today that aims to settle years of tension between airlines and passengers who bring their pets on board for free by saying they need them for emotional support.

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