The Dubuque Regional Airport Commission took a huge step forward in deciding to name its airport terminal in honor of Robert L. Martin, a Dubuque native and Tuskegee Airman.

Those who supported this effort should be commended.

Would it be more significant to name the whole airport after him? Sure, it would. We all know the names of many airports ... and not very many airport terminals.

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But it’s understandable, given that the cost of changing the name of an airport is prohibitive.

That shouldn’t diminish this move in the right direction. With signage on the building and the installation of a memorial in his honor, the recognition will raise the profile of the pioneering Black World War II combat pilot.

All that will require an estimated $100,000 be raised by supporters for the design, construction and installation of the recognition. If the collection continues to grow, maybe the city can one day be home to the Robert Martin Dubuque Regional Airport.

Until then, this is a great way to honor the war hero who earned the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Purple Heart and the Congressional Gold Medal among other commendations.

Martin’s achievements and his humble roots in Dubuque is a piece of local history that should be told, saluted and immortalized. The Dubuque Regional Airport Commission and community organizers have taken the first steps in telling that story. Now, it’s up to the community to offer support.

Donations can be sent to the Dubuque Branch of the NAACP C/O Capt. Martin Memorial at PO BOX 1012, Dubuque, IA 52004, or online at https://gf.me/u/yhf4z9.

It’s time for every community in Iowa — and Wisconsin and Illinois, too — to be more like Balltown.

OK, so maybe your city doesn’t have the spectacular view or the state’s oldest bar and restaurant. But there is one way other cities and towns can be like Balltown: Complete the census.

Last week, Iowa Lt. Gov. Adam Gregg and Secretary of State Paul Pate presented the “Key to the Future” award to Balltown for reaching a 100% response rate for the 2020 census.

Now, granted, Balltown only has 73 people (at last count), and the mayor did have to resort to texting a few people. Still, the Dubuque County town set a great example by getting every last person to participate.

If we’ve learned anything in the last few months, it’s that the connection between government and people is vital. At the city, county, state and federal levels, our elected officials are charged with taking care of citizens and responding to community needs.

A key factor when it comes to the distribution of resources is population. That’s why every decade, local officials take seriously the need to get the census count right. Right now, it’s vitally important that every member of our community be counted.

Our elected officials at every level have plenty to contend with because of the pandemic. Let’s do our part by participating in the census online, by phone or by mail.

The results of the count are used to distribute billions of federal dollars and to determine legislative districts, among other uses. Obtaining an accurate 2020 census count is critical to ensuring that our cities, towns, counties, states and congressional districts are getting the funding and resources they deserve.

Make sure you’re counted. Your city, and state, are counting on you.

It was heartening to see 10 people step forward and express a willingness to fill the vacant seat on the Dubuque City Council, an opening created when Brett Shaw resigned because he was moving out of town.

Among the applicants are people who have served on city boards and commissions, former elected officials, community leaders, business owners and more. The appointed applicant will represent Ward 1 until the Nov. 2, 2021, election, unless residents petition to have the seat filled by special election.

It’s encouraging to see a strong field of candidates who want to move the City of Dubuque forward and are willing to take on the headaches and time commitment. A nod of gratitude to all who applied.

Editorials reflect the consensus of the Telegraph Herald Editorial Board.