MLB Political Contributions Baseball

In this Feb. 14, 2020, file photo, baseballs occupy a bucket after use during fielding practice during spring training baseball workouts for pitchers and catchers at Cleveland Indians camp in Avondale, Ariz. Major League Baseball is suspending all political contributions in the wake of last week's invasion of the U.S. Capitol by a mob loyal to President Donald Trump, joining a wave of major corporations rethinking their efforts to lobby Washington. “In light of the unprecedented events last week at the U.S. Capitol, MLB is suspending contributions from its Political Action Committee pending a review of our political contribution policy going forward,” the league said in a statement to The Associated Press on Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2021. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

NEW YORK — Major League Baseball is suspending all political contributions in the wake of last week’s invasion of the U.S. Capitol by a mob loyal to President Donald Trump, joining a wave of major corporations rethinking their efforts to lobby Washington.

“In light of the unprecedented events last week at the U.S. Capitol, MLB is suspending contributions from its Political Action Committee pending a review of our political contribution policy going forward,” the league said in a statement to The Associated Press on Wednesday.

Following the insurrection last week by Trump supporters while Congress attempted to certify the results of the presidential election, many companies have said they will avoid making donations to members of the House and Senate who voted to overturn President-elect Joe Biden’s victory over Trump. Others, like MLB, have postponed political giving to both political parties altogether.

MLB is the first of the major professional sports leagues to say it would alter its lobbying strategy in the wake of the deadly Capitol riots.

The Office of The Commissioner of Major League Baseball Political Action Committee has donated $669,375 to Senate and House candidates since the 2016 election cycle, with 52.4% of that money going to Republican candidates, according to The Center for Responsive Politics.

TORONTO — Mark Shapiro has been given a five-year contract extension as the Toronto Blue Jays’ president and chief executive officer. Rogers Communications, which owns the team, made the announcement Wednesday. Shapiro worked for the Cleveland Indians before becoming the Blue Jays’ president on Oct. 31, 2015.

FOOTBALL

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — John Elway’s replacement as Broncos general manager will be Vikings executive George Paton. Elway announced the hiring Wednesday. Denver hasn’t reached the playoffs since winning Super Bowl 50 five years ago. Paton spent the last 14 seasons with Minnesota, including the last six as vice president of player personnel and assistant general manager. He’s been one of the hottest names on the GM circuit in recent years.

KANSAS CITY, Mo — Chiefs running back Clyde Edwards-Helaire practiced Wednesday for the first time since getting hurt against New Orleans in Week 15, raising hopes the first-round pick can play in the divisional round of the playoffs against Cleveland on Sunday. Edwards-Helaire had been out with a high-ankle sprain, causing him to miss the Chiefs’ final two regular-season games.

PHILADELPHIA — The Philadelphia Eagles won’t be penalized after the NFL looked into the way the team handled its quarterback decisions in the final regular-season game against Washington.

New York Giants (6-10) players and fans were angry that Pederson tanked. The loss gave Philadelphia the sixth pick in the draft instead of the ninth.

NEW YORK — The search for a new coach continues for the New York Jets after they completed an in-person interview with San Francisco 49ers defensive coordinator Robert Saleh on Wednesday without apparently reaching a deal.

Saleh was the first of the nine known candidates to speak remotely with the Jets last week to be hosted by the team at its facility in Florham Park, New Jersey.

BASKETBALL

Contact tracing issues involving the Phoenix Suns and Washington Wizards forced the NBA to postpone three more games Wednesday, raising the leaguewide total from this week alone to eight. The NBA also revealed Wednesday that 16 players — by far the most in a one-week period since training camps started — returned positive COVID-19 tests between Jan. 6 and Tuesday. With 497 players tested, that reflects a positivity rate of 3.2%.

Phoenix’s home game Wednesday against Atlanta was called off, as was the Suns’ home game with Golden State on Friday. Also called: Friday’s game where the Wizards would have gone to Detroit. The reason in all three cases was the same, that the Suns and Wizards wouldn’t have enough players cleared to participate.

SWIMMING

Five-time Olympic swimming medalist Klete Keller was charged Wednesday with participating in a deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol after video emerged that appeared to show him among those storming the building last week.

An FBI complaint, citing screenshots from the video, asked that a warrant be issued charging Keller with knowingly entering a restricted building without lawful authority and attempting to impede an official government function.

The 38-year-old Keller competed in the 2000, 2004 and 2008 Summer Olympics. He captured two golds and a silver.